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Alcohol testing within family law proceedings

In some situations, allegations are made between parents as to the consumption of alcohol. Where there are concerns of this nature, often contact between children and the accused parent is limited until clear evidence as to the sobriety of the parent is established.

Can I take my child abroad without the other parent’s consent?

We are often asked who can take a child out of the UK on holiday and whether the consent of both parents is required.

What is reasonable access for fathers?

This is a tricky question to answer. Each case is different and there is no “one size fits all” answer as one type of contact arrangement that may suit some and not others.

When deciding on contact arrangements, you will need to consider how much hands-on care the non-resident parent can realistically provide and how much they have provided in the past. You also need to consider the age of the child, schooling arrangements for the child and any work commitments.

Top 10 Facts about Parental Responsibility

Here are top 10 facts about parental responsibility that you should know:-

1.  Parental Responsibility is automatically granted to the mother of a child, and to both parents if they are married when the child is born or marry afterwards. If unmarried parents are listed on the birth certificate and were present at the registration of the birth of the child they will have parental responsibility. If one parent was not present, but is listed on the birth certificate, they may not have parental responsibility.

Who decides which parent should have custody of a child?

When parents separate, the first question for most is going to be:  Who is going to look after the child or children or, put differently, how much time is the child going to spend with each parent?  Often the word "custody" is used in this context, but this word has no specific, legal meaning.  If there is a court order defining where a child will live, it is called a "child arrangements order".  However, it is usually not necessary to have a child arrangements order to determine where a child will live or who will have "custody" for a child.