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divorce

  • Creating a Parenting Plan - Put your children first

    Going through a marital breakdown is a stressful and emotional period for all the family, and sometimes it can be difficult to focus on the emotional needs of your children when you are feeling in such a turmoil yourself. It is, however, really important to listen to your children and ask them how they feel and what is worrying them as their feelings could be different to yours, and how you respond can significantly affect their wellbeing.

  • You don't have to go to Court to resolve marital disputes

    My ex-partner and I disagree over arrangements for our children - Do we have to go to Court?

    No, a court application is only a last resort if you can’t reach agreement by another method. First you should try discussing things directly with your ex but if this doesn’t work, a mediator may be able to help. A mediator is a neutral third party who can help you both understand your differences and reach a compromise.

  • Family Dispute Resolution Week starts 24th November

    Resolution's biggest public-facing campaign of the year, Family Dispute Resolution Week, launched on 24th November.  

    Marriage Separation and Divorce is devastating. But it doesn't have to be. There is a better way for you, your family and your children, which family law organisation Resolution is highlighting as part of Family Dispute Resolution Week 24-28 November. Take a few minutes to view the campaign video.

  • Grounds for Divorce - ‘Unreasonable Behaviour’

    To file for divorce you need to prove there has been an irretrievable breakdown in your marriage and ‘unreasonable behaviour’ serves as one of the five grounds for divorce.
    Unreasonable behaviour varies from person to person but examples of the types of unreasonable behaviour often cited within Divorce Proceedings are as follows:

  • Mediation: a better way to separate

    Wondering where to start with sorting out matters after your separation? Mediation offers a safe and private forum for separating couples to discuss how to manage arrangements for their children and finances.

  • Separating from your spouse – What are your options?

    Separating from your spouse is not an easy decision to make, but if you are in a relationship which no longer makes you happy, and you have tried to resolve issues between each other without success, then a period of separation can give you both some valuable time and space to decide if you can, and want, to make your partnership work, or if a permanent separation is best solution for you, your spouse and your children.

    The legal system and the options available if you are going through separation and divorce can seem confusing and often overwhelming so to help you gain an understanding on the options available to you, your legal entitlements and how to start the process, it is advisable to take some professional advice. You may also benefit from seeking extra support from friends, family members, work colleagues or a relationship counsellor who will help you through this emotional time of conflict and uncertainty.

  • What are the chances of a father winning custody of children?

    There has been a historic problem in the family court with Judges favouring mothers over fathers, as it was thought they would be more capable of caring for the children of the family. When two parents cannot agree where their children should live, or if one parent fears the other cannot care for the children properly, they have the option of taking the matter to Court. The Court hears both parties, and after several hearings a decision will be made about where the children live (also called custody) and when they see the non-resident parent.

  • What is Spousal Maintenance?

    Part of the divorce process requires you both to come to an agreement on financial matters; how assets and debts will be divided, and what maintenance payments (if any) are required to be paid.
    Spousal maintenance provides some financial security for the spouse who is unable to support themselves without additional support payments.